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Thursday, June 9, 2016

Week of June 5, 2016

Fear.  You know, something stands out in a word search of "fear."  See if you pick up on it:


Noun 
An unpleasant emotion caused by the belief that someone or something is dangerous, likely to cause pain, or a threat... 
archaic.  A mixed feeling of dread and reverence... 
(Fear for) A feeling of anxiety concerning the outcome of something or the safety and well-being of someone... 
The likelihood of something unwelcome happening... 
Verb 
[with object]
Be afraid (of someone or something), as likely to be dangerous, painful, or threatening... 
[no object] (fear for) Feel anxiety or apprehension on behalf of... 
[with infinitive] Avoid or put off doing something because one is afraid... 
Used to express regret or apology... 
archaic.  Regard (God) with reverence and awe...

The word "fear" comes from the Old English word "faer" and "faeran."  There's even an old obsolete use of the transitive form containing the idea that one can give fear or cause the effects of fear within a person, almost as if fear were an object.  That still holds true in gaming.  Such games as World of Warcraft allow players to use "fear spells" that invoke fear in another player's avatar, thereby effecting it's ability to perform at the mere push of a button.

Maybe you caught it.  Maybe you didn't.  Maybe it's just me.  When you step back and observe the idea/energy contained in this symbol of four characters representing a particular organization of vowel and consonant sounds, an instantaneous symphony of labials and gutturals, do you, like me, feel the trick--the deceit--in this word?

Phrases like "caused by the belief that..." and "feeling of dread" and "the likelihood of something..." seem to embody the concept or perception of being trapped outside of the body (which is always at home in the present moment).  The energy of "fear" is the result of leaving the present moment and trying to prepare ourselves for what we think we know based on what we think we have understood.  The Old English "faer" calls up an energy of momentary calamity.  In medieval times, I can imagine those momentary calamities were more prevalent: accidental death by structural failures, animal attacks, clans storming the village, storms wreaking havoc without warning, etc.  Early in our instinctual development, I imagine "faer" would've come in handy at the sound of rustling thickets or a soft, deep growl.  "Faer" would've anticipated what usually happens next: the death pounce of the lurking predator.  It's archetypal, which means it's the stuff of your dreams--the fuel behind your cold sweat and the choking pressure of your palpitations on those nights.

"Fear" may be different.  Fear is forgotten, ignored, and pushed into the manageable ocean of our emotional stockpile.  But nothing in the unconscious is ever missed.  When we choose not to deal with fear in the body--in the moment--fear goes to that shadow region.  In a sense, we allow it to reluctantly slip Tolkien's ring upon its shaky finger, and it moves in that shadowy world, unseen by the embodied.  Yet it is seen.  It is seen all the more by the darkness.  The longer it lingers there, the more likely it is to eventually carry the darkness into the light (Luke 11.34).  The unconscious will have balance, whether we take an active role in restoring the balance or not.  Ignored "fear" will, through a shower of synchronicity, begin to reshape one's embodied, present reality.  We may commence battle with the weapon of pharmaceuticals, but the war is truly fought in a mythical world of archetypes--an "as above, so below" mainframe processing both conscious and unconscious awareness.

I believe that last phrase to be the starting point: unconscious awareness.  Sure, it's an oxymoron-ic phrase; but it stands nonetheless.  One cannot know the momentary contents of the unconscious mainly because the unconscious is timeless (Again, see your dreamworld).  However, one can become aware of the unconscious.  One can wake up to the effects of a pattern of bad results: encounter - emotional response - fight or flight (to deal with it or not to deal with it) - WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

If we're not careful, Ignored "fear" becomes a code in the program that skips the encounter, traps us in the emotional response, which uses up our psychological resources, reconstituting us in constant flight mode.  When that happens, we've lost the light of present-moment encounters and the possibility of new next-happenings.  The system, as Tom Campbell would say, has increased entropy.  The goal of an ever-changing, progressive system or reality or organism is always to decrease entropy.

Emotionally and biblically speaking, that's LOVE.


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